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Japan’s New Black Ramen Is for Everyone Who's Tired of Rainbow Food

Japan’s New Black Ramen Is for Everyone Who's Tired of Rainbow Food


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Nissin Cup Noodle is going back to black with squid ink instant ramen

The new pitch-black instant ramen from Nissin Cup Noodle is the perfect antidote to the unicorn food trend.

The world has hit critical mass of rainbow-themed foods. From pizza to bagels to Frappuccinos, it seems like every food that can be rainbowed has surely been rainbowed by now. Finally the rainbow trend seems to be waning, and Japan’s biggest instant noodle company is taking things back to black with a new Black Seafood Cup Noodle that looks downright elegant by comparison.

According to Sora News 24, the new Black Seafood Cup Noodle is an extra-large cup of just-add-water instant noodles. It has a pork and seafood broth designed to go well with the seafood-filled ramen, and it comes with a special packet of squid ink paste that dyes the broth inky black.

In addition to the black broth and noodles, the cup is full of little pieces of squid, fish sausage, cabbage, egg, and green onions.

The black ramen may seem like the opposite of the unicorn food trend, but they do have one thing in common: Instagram. Rainbow food is designed to look great on social media, and Nissin’s new black seafood ramen is designed for that too. The company’s press release describes the new Squid Ink Seafood Ramen as “photogenic,” which is a classy way of saying, “You should take pictures of this for Instagram.”

Squid ink ramen is not unheard of in Japan, but it’s the sort of thing one can usually only find at a gourmet venue. This instant version can be made in a person’s house with just some hot water. It goes on sale on July 31 at supermarkets and convenience stores around Japan, and it will cost just 205 yen, or $1.85 apiece.


How Instant Noodles Is Eaten In Different Countries Around The World

Everyone around the world loves instant noodles. I mean, what’s not to like? It’s tasty, it’s quick and it’s the appropriate amount of unhealthy all fast foods are. But, creating something like this has been no accident. In 1958, Momofuku Ando started a billion-dollar industry by launching the first-ever packet of instant noodles in the world.

After the second world war ended, Japan faced a dire food shortage in the country worsened by the worst harvest season. It was reportedly the worst famine they had faced in decades with hundreds of people dying from malnutrition.

To fight this hunger, thousands of unlicensed open-air markets opened up catering raw vegetables to factory workers. These were called “black markets” and a lot of them also sold American surplus wheat. During this time, the Japanese government pushed the citizens to consume meals including bread and biscuits using this wheat.

However, Ando was reluctant. Upon observing a long line on a cold night, just to buy a warm bowl of ramen noodles at one such black market, Ando realized the demand for noodles. He questioned why must Japan replace its culture and not use the wheat to produce Japan’s noodles. But, he was alone in his quest and since nobody listened, he decided to find an answer himself.

Over the course of next year, Ando started researching ramen, in a shed he builds in his backyard, on a sleep schedule of four hours a night. Frustrated Ando, unable to find a way to increase the shelf life and retain the taste, one day saw his wife frying tempura, which gave him a brilliant idea.

He fried a block of noodles and noticed that the hot oil extracts the moisture from it and when dipped in warm water, it gets hydrated back. Ando discovered a technology now called, “flash frying.” On August 25, 1958, the very first packet of Chicken Ramen, the instant noodle was launched and changed the name of his company to Nissin.

Instant ramen was well, an instant hit. In its first year, it sold 13 million packages, only for the sales to hit billions in the coming decade. Soon after the success of Nissin Chicken Ramen, multiple companies across the globe started picking the product up.

Now, instant ramen is available on the shelves of every grocery store, making it the most popular instant snack int the world.

Although instant noodles initially were just a product of boiling the noodles and seasoning the soup, over decades and with multi-cultural influences, every country in the world has a unique way of preparing it. So, let us try cooking a couple of different recipes today.


How Instant Noodles Is Eaten In Different Countries Around The World

Everyone around the world loves instant noodles. I mean, what’s not to like? It’s tasty, it’s quick and it’s the appropriate amount of unhealthy all fast foods are. But, creating something like this has been no accident. In 1958, Momofuku Ando started a billion-dollar industry by launching the first-ever packet of instant noodles in the world.

After the second world war ended, Japan faced a dire food shortage in the country worsened by the worst harvest season. It was reportedly the worst famine they had faced in decades with hundreds of people dying from malnutrition.

To fight this hunger, thousands of unlicensed open-air markets opened up catering raw vegetables to factory workers. These were called “black markets” and a lot of them also sold American surplus wheat. During this time, the Japanese government pushed the citizens to consume meals including bread and biscuits using this wheat.

However, Ando was reluctant. Upon observing a long line on a cold night, just to buy a warm bowl of ramen noodles at one such black market, Ando realized the demand for noodles. He questioned why must Japan replace its culture and not use the wheat to produce Japan’s noodles. But, he was alone in his quest and since nobody listened, he decided to find an answer himself.

Over the course of next year, Ando started researching ramen, in a shed he builds in his backyard, on a sleep schedule of four hours a night. Frustrated Ando, unable to find a way to increase the shelf life and retain the taste, one day saw his wife frying tempura, which gave him a brilliant idea.

He fried a block of noodles and noticed that the hot oil extracts the moisture from it and when dipped in warm water, it gets hydrated back. Ando discovered a technology now called, “flash frying.” On August 25, 1958, the very first packet of Chicken Ramen, the instant noodle was launched and changed the name of his company to Nissin.

Instant ramen was well, an instant hit. In its first year, it sold 13 million packages, only for the sales to hit billions in the coming decade. Soon after the success of Nissin Chicken Ramen, multiple companies across the globe started picking the product up.

Now, instant ramen is available on the shelves of every grocery store, making it the most popular instant snack int the world.

Although instant noodles initially were just a product of boiling the noodles and seasoning the soup, over decades and with multi-cultural influences, every country in the world has a unique way of preparing it. So, let us try cooking a couple of different recipes today.


How Instant Noodles Is Eaten In Different Countries Around The World

Everyone around the world loves instant noodles. I mean, what’s not to like? It’s tasty, it’s quick and it’s the appropriate amount of unhealthy all fast foods are. But, creating something like this has been no accident. In 1958, Momofuku Ando started a billion-dollar industry by launching the first-ever packet of instant noodles in the world.

After the second world war ended, Japan faced a dire food shortage in the country worsened by the worst harvest season. It was reportedly the worst famine they had faced in decades with hundreds of people dying from malnutrition.

To fight this hunger, thousands of unlicensed open-air markets opened up catering raw vegetables to factory workers. These were called “black markets” and a lot of them also sold American surplus wheat. During this time, the Japanese government pushed the citizens to consume meals including bread and biscuits using this wheat.

However, Ando was reluctant. Upon observing a long line on a cold night, just to buy a warm bowl of ramen noodles at one such black market, Ando realized the demand for noodles. He questioned why must Japan replace its culture and not use the wheat to produce Japan’s noodles. But, he was alone in his quest and since nobody listened, he decided to find an answer himself.

Over the course of next year, Ando started researching ramen, in a shed he builds in his backyard, on a sleep schedule of four hours a night. Frustrated Ando, unable to find a way to increase the shelf life and retain the taste, one day saw his wife frying tempura, which gave him a brilliant idea.

He fried a block of noodles and noticed that the hot oil extracts the moisture from it and when dipped in warm water, it gets hydrated back. Ando discovered a technology now called, “flash frying.” On August 25, 1958, the very first packet of Chicken Ramen, the instant noodle was launched and changed the name of his company to Nissin.

Instant ramen was well, an instant hit. In its first year, it sold 13 million packages, only for the sales to hit billions in the coming decade. Soon after the success of Nissin Chicken Ramen, multiple companies across the globe started picking the product up.

Now, instant ramen is available on the shelves of every grocery store, making it the most popular instant snack int the world.

Although instant noodles initially were just a product of boiling the noodles and seasoning the soup, over decades and with multi-cultural influences, every country in the world has a unique way of preparing it. So, let us try cooking a couple of different recipes today.


How Instant Noodles Is Eaten In Different Countries Around The World

Everyone around the world loves instant noodles. I mean, what’s not to like? It’s tasty, it’s quick and it’s the appropriate amount of unhealthy all fast foods are. But, creating something like this has been no accident. In 1958, Momofuku Ando started a billion-dollar industry by launching the first-ever packet of instant noodles in the world.

After the second world war ended, Japan faced a dire food shortage in the country worsened by the worst harvest season. It was reportedly the worst famine they had faced in decades with hundreds of people dying from malnutrition.

To fight this hunger, thousands of unlicensed open-air markets opened up catering raw vegetables to factory workers. These were called “black markets” and a lot of them also sold American surplus wheat. During this time, the Japanese government pushed the citizens to consume meals including bread and biscuits using this wheat.

However, Ando was reluctant. Upon observing a long line on a cold night, just to buy a warm bowl of ramen noodles at one such black market, Ando realized the demand for noodles. He questioned why must Japan replace its culture and not use the wheat to produce Japan’s noodles. But, he was alone in his quest and since nobody listened, he decided to find an answer himself.

Over the course of next year, Ando started researching ramen, in a shed he builds in his backyard, on a sleep schedule of four hours a night. Frustrated Ando, unable to find a way to increase the shelf life and retain the taste, one day saw his wife frying tempura, which gave him a brilliant idea.

He fried a block of noodles and noticed that the hot oil extracts the moisture from it and when dipped in warm water, it gets hydrated back. Ando discovered a technology now called, “flash frying.” On August 25, 1958, the very first packet of Chicken Ramen, the instant noodle was launched and changed the name of his company to Nissin.

Instant ramen was well, an instant hit. In its first year, it sold 13 million packages, only for the sales to hit billions in the coming decade. Soon after the success of Nissin Chicken Ramen, multiple companies across the globe started picking the product up.

Now, instant ramen is available on the shelves of every grocery store, making it the most popular instant snack int the world.

Although instant noodles initially were just a product of boiling the noodles and seasoning the soup, over decades and with multi-cultural influences, every country in the world has a unique way of preparing it. So, let us try cooking a couple of different recipes today.


How Instant Noodles Is Eaten In Different Countries Around The World

Everyone around the world loves instant noodles. I mean, what’s not to like? It’s tasty, it’s quick and it’s the appropriate amount of unhealthy all fast foods are. But, creating something like this has been no accident. In 1958, Momofuku Ando started a billion-dollar industry by launching the first-ever packet of instant noodles in the world.

After the second world war ended, Japan faced a dire food shortage in the country worsened by the worst harvest season. It was reportedly the worst famine they had faced in decades with hundreds of people dying from malnutrition.

To fight this hunger, thousands of unlicensed open-air markets opened up catering raw vegetables to factory workers. These were called “black markets” and a lot of them also sold American surplus wheat. During this time, the Japanese government pushed the citizens to consume meals including bread and biscuits using this wheat.

However, Ando was reluctant. Upon observing a long line on a cold night, just to buy a warm bowl of ramen noodles at one such black market, Ando realized the demand for noodles. He questioned why must Japan replace its culture and not use the wheat to produce Japan’s noodles. But, he was alone in his quest and since nobody listened, he decided to find an answer himself.

Over the course of next year, Ando started researching ramen, in a shed he builds in his backyard, on a sleep schedule of four hours a night. Frustrated Ando, unable to find a way to increase the shelf life and retain the taste, one day saw his wife frying tempura, which gave him a brilliant idea.

He fried a block of noodles and noticed that the hot oil extracts the moisture from it and when dipped in warm water, it gets hydrated back. Ando discovered a technology now called, “flash frying.” On August 25, 1958, the very first packet of Chicken Ramen, the instant noodle was launched and changed the name of his company to Nissin.

Instant ramen was well, an instant hit. In its first year, it sold 13 million packages, only for the sales to hit billions in the coming decade. Soon after the success of Nissin Chicken Ramen, multiple companies across the globe started picking the product up.

Now, instant ramen is available on the shelves of every grocery store, making it the most popular instant snack int the world.

Although instant noodles initially were just a product of boiling the noodles and seasoning the soup, over decades and with multi-cultural influences, every country in the world has a unique way of preparing it. So, let us try cooking a couple of different recipes today.


How Instant Noodles Is Eaten In Different Countries Around The World

Everyone around the world loves instant noodles. I mean, what’s not to like? It’s tasty, it’s quick and it’s the appropriate amount of unhealthy all fast foods are. But, creating something like this has been no accident. In 1958, Momofuku Ando started a billion-dollar industry by launching the first-ever packet of instant noodles in the world.

After the second world war ended, Japan faced a dire food shortage in the country worsened by the worst harvest season. It was reportedly the worst famine they had faced in decades with hundreds of people dying from malnutrition.

To fight this hunger, thousands of unlicensed open-air markets opened up catering raw vegetables to factory workers. These were called “black markets” and a lot of them also sold American surplus wheat. During this time, the Japanese government pushed the citizens to consume meals including bread and biscuits using this wheat.

However, Ando was reluctant. Upon observing a long line on a cold night, just to buy a warm bowl of ramen noodles at one such black market, Ando realized the demand for noodles. He questioned why must Japan replace its culture and not use the wheat to produce Japan’s noodles. But, he was alone in his quest and since nobody listened, he decided to find an answer himself.

Over the course of next year, Ando started researching ramen, in a shed he builds in his backyard, on a sleep schedule of four hours a night. Frustrated Ando, unable to find a way to increase the shelf life and retain the taste, one day saw his wife frying tempura, which gave him a brilliant idea.

He fried a block of noodles and noticed that the hot oil extracts the moisture from it and when dipped in warm water, it gets hydrated back. Ando discovered a technology now called, “flash frying.” On August 25, 1958, the very first packet of Chicken Ramen, the instant noodle was launched and changed the name of his company to Nissin.

Instant ramen was well, an instant hit. In its first year, it sold 13 million packages, only for the sales to hit billions in the coming decade. Soon after the success of Nissin Chicken Ramen, multiple companies across the globe started picking the product up.

Now, instant ramen is available on the shelves of every grocery store, making it the most popular instant snack int the world.

Although instant noodles initially were just a product of boiling the noodles and seasoning the soup, over decades and with multi-cultural influences, every country in the world has a unique way of preparing it. So, let us try cooking a couple of different recipes today.


How Instant Noodles Is Eaten In Different Countries Around The World

Everyone around the world loves instant noodles. I mean, what’s not to like? It’s tasty, it’s quick and it’s the appropriate amount of unhealthy all fast foods are. But, creating something like this has been no accident. In 1958, Momofuku Ando started a billion-dollar industry by launching the first-ever packet of instant noodles in the world.

After the second world war ended, Japan faced a dire food shortage in the country worsened by the worst harvest season. It was reportedly the worst famine they had faced in decades with hundreds of people dying from malnutrition.

To fight this hunger, thousands of unlicensed open-air markets opened up catering raw vegetables to factory workers. These were called “black markets” and a lot of them also sold American surplus wheat. During this time, the Japanese government pushed the citizens to consume meals including bread and biscuits using this wheat.

However, Ando was reluctant. Upon observing a long line on a cold night, just to buy a warm bowl of ramen noodles at one such black market, Ando realized the demand for noodles. He questioned why must Japan replace its culture and not use the wheat to produce Japan’s noodles. But, he was alone in his quest and since nobody listened, he decided to find an answer himself.

Over the course of next year, Ando started researching ramen, in a shed he builds in his backyard, on a sleep schedule of four hours a night. Frustrated Ando, unable to find a way to increase the shelf life and retain the taste, one day saw his wife frying tempura, which gave him a brilliant idea.

He fried a block of noodles and noticed that the hot oil extracts the moisture from it and when dipped in warm water, it gets hydrated back. Ando discovered a technology now called, “flash frying.” On August 25, 1958, the very first packet of Chicken Ramen, the instant noodle was launched and changed the name of his company to Nissin.

Instant ramen was well, an instant hit. In its first year, it sold 13 million packages, only for the sales to hit billions in the coming decade. Soon after the success of Nissin Chicken Ramen, multiple companies across the globe started picking the product up.

Now, instant ramen is available on the shelves of every grocery store, making it the most popular instant snack int the world.

Although instant noodles initially were just a product of boiling the noodles and seasoning the soup, over decades and with multi-cultural influences, every country in the world has a unique way of preparing it. So, let us try cooking a couple of different recipes today.


How Instant Noodles Is Eaten In Different Countries Around The World

Everyone around the world loves instant noodles. I mean, what’s not to like? It’s tasty, it’s quick and it’s the appropriate amount of unhealthy all fast foods are. But, creating something like this has been no accident. In 1958, Momofuku Ando started a billion-dollar industry by launching the first-ever packet of instant noodles in the world.

After the second world war ended, Japan faced a dire food shortage in the country worsened by the worst harvest season. It was reportedly the worst famine they had faced in decades with hundreds of people dying from malnutrition.

To fight this hunger, thousands of unlicensed open-air markets opened up catering raw vegetables to factory workers. These were called “black markets” and a lot of them also sold American surplus wheat. During this time, the Japanese government pushed the citizens to consume meals including bread and biscuits using this wheat.

However, Ando was reluctant. Upon observing a long line on a cold night, just to buy a warm bowl of ramen noodles at one such black market, Ando realized the demand for noodles. He questioned why must Japan replace its culture and not use the wheat to produce Japan’s noodles. But, he was alone in his quest and since nobody listened, he decided to find an answer himself.

Over the course of next year, Ando started researching ramen, in a shed he builds in his backyard, on a sleep schedule of four hours a night. Frustrated Ando, unable to find a way to increase the shelf life and retain the taste, one day saw his wife frying tempura, which gave him a brilliant idea.

He fried a block of noodles and noticed that the hot oil extracts the moisture from it and when dipped in warm water, it gets hydrated back. Ando discovered a technology now called, “flash frying.” On August 25, 1958, the very first packet of Chicken Ramen, the instant noodle was launched and changed the name of his company to Nissin.

Instant ramen was well, an instant hit. In its first year, it sold 13 million packages, only for the sales to hit billions in the coming decade. Soon after the success of Nissin Chicken Ramen, multiple companies across the globe started picking the product up.

Now, instant ramen is available on the shelves of every grocery store, making it the most popular instant snack int the world.

Although instant noodles initially were just a product of boiling the noodles and seasoning the soup, over decades and with multi-cultural influences, every country in the world has a unique way of preparing it. So, let us try cooking a couple of different recipes today.


How Instant Noodles Is Eaten In Different Countries Around The World

Everyone around the world loves instant noodles. I mean, what’s not to like? It’s tasty, it’s quick and it’s the appropriate amount of unhealthy all fast foods are. But, creating something like this has been no accident. In 1958, Momofuku Ando started a billion-dollar industry by launching the first-ever packet of instant noodles in the world.

After the second world war ended, Japan faced a dire food shortage in the country worsened by the worst harvest season. It was reportedly the worst famine they had faced in decades with hundreds of people dying from malnutrition.

To fight this hunger, thousands of unlicensed open-air markets opened up catering raw vegetables to factory workers. These were called “black markets” and a lot of them also sold American surplus wheat. During this time, the Japanese government pushed the citizens to consume meals including bread and biscuits using this wheat.

However, Ando was reluctant. Upon observing a long line on a cold night, just to buy a warm bowl of ramen noodles at one such black market, Ando realized the demand for noodles. He questioned why must Japan replace its culture and not use the wheat to produce Japan’s noodles. But, he was alone in his quest and since nobody listened, he decided to find an answer himself.

Over the course of next year, Ando started researching ramen, in a shed he builds in his backyard, on a sleep schedule of four hours a night. Frustrated Ando, unable to find a way to increase the shelf life and retain the taste, one day saw his wife frying tempura, which gave him a brilliant idea.

He fried a block of noodles and noticed that the hot oil extracts the moisture from it and when dipped in warm water, it gets hydrated back. Ando discovered a technology now called, “flash frying.” On August 25, 1958, the very first packet of Chicken Ramen, the instant noodle was launched and changed the name of his company to Nissin.

Instant ramen was well, an instant hit. In its first year, it sold 13 million packages, only for the sales to hit billions in the coming decade. Soon after the success of Nissin Chicken Ramen, multiple companies across the globe started picking the product up.

Now, instant ramen is available on the shelves of every grocery store, making it the most popular instant snack int the world.

Although instant noodles initially were just a product of boiling the noodles and seasoning the soup, over decades and with multi-cultural influences, every country in the world has a unique way of preparing it. So, let us try cooking a couple of different recipes today.


How Instant Noodles Is Eaten In Different Countries Around The World

Everyone around the world loves instant noodles. I mean, what’s not to like? It’s tasty, it’s quick and it’s the appropriate amount of unhealthy all fast foods are. But, creating something like this has been no accident. In 1958, Momofuku Ando started a billion-dollar industry by launching the first-ever packet of instant noodles in the world.

After the second world war ended, Japan faced a dire food shortage in the country worsened by the worst harvest season. It was reportedly the worst famine they had faced in decades with hundreds of people dying from malnutrition.

To fight this hunger, thousands of unlicensed open-air markets opened up catering raw vegetables to factory workers. These were called “black markets” and a lot of them also sold American surplus wheat. During this time, the Japanese government pushed the citizens to consume meals including bread and biscuits using this wheat.

However, Ando was reluctant. Upon observing a long line on a cold night, just to buy a warm bowl of ramen noodles at one such black market, Ando realized the demand for noodles. He questioned why must Japan replace its culture and not use the wheat to produce Japan’s noodles. But, he was alone in his quest and since nobody listened, he decided to find an answer himself.

Over the course of next year, Ando started researching ramen, in a shed he builds in his backyard, on a sleep schedule of four hours a night. Frustrated Ando, unable to find a way to increase the shelf life and retain the taste, one day saw his wife frying tempura, which gave him a brilliant idea.

He fried a block of noodles and noticed that the hot oil extracts the moisture from it and when dipped in warm water, it gets hydrated back. Ando discovered a technology now called, “flash frying.” On August 25, 1958, the very first packet of Chicken Ramen, the instant noodle was launched and changed the name of his company to Nissin.

Instant ramen was well, an instant hit. In its first year, it sold 13 million packages, only for the sales to hit billions in the coming decade. Soon after the success of Nissin Chicken Ramen, multiple companies across the globe started picking the product up.

Now, instant ramen is available on the shelves of every grocery store, making it the most popular instant snack int the world.

Although instant noodles initially were just a product of boiling the noodles and seasoning the soup, over decades and with multi-cultural influences, every country in the world has a unique way of preparing it. So, let us try cooking a couple of different recipes today.


Watch the video: Ramen Noodles. Ramen #shorts (June 2022).


Comments:

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